Answering ancient questions: what is goodness?

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People’ve been asking this question for a long, long, long time. 

About 2,300 years ago, in ancient Greece, a very wise man named Plato recorded many of the words of his master, Socrates. Once, Socrates had a conversation with a priest of the gods, whose name was Euthyphro. Socrates loved to ask people questions about all sorts of things. In this case, he questions Euthyphro on the nature of “piety” or “piousness:” that is, following what the gods command.

The fundamental question becomes: is the pious pious because the gods ordain it, or is the pious some higher standard that the gods adhere to?

This question has come down through history to us like this: is goodness good because God commands it, or is God held by some higher standard of good? Both answers have problems. (more…)

6 Questions Creationists Need to Stop Asking

In the wake of the recent, highly publicized debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, I ran across this article by Matt Stopera:  22 Messages from Creationists to People Who Believe in Evolution. Stopera asked 22 people who identified themselves as “creationists” to write a message or question to evolutionists.

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Most of the results are groan-worthy.

I’m not going to address them all (or even most of them), but I get the impression that these questions are meant to be magic bullets that’ll leave evolutionists dumbstruck and only able to say, like Job, ‘Behold, I am of small account; what shall I answer you?’

The thing is, it doesn’t work like that. You are never going to defeat the entire theory of evolution by posing a simple (or impossibly complex) question, as though your listener had never considered the issue. There are a lot of thought-provoking questions that can be asked, but the following are not among them:

(more…)

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